Home » Vocabulary » Numbers

NumbersPlay

Ones, tens, thousands, millions…

Basic Numbers

0
Zero
1
One
2
Two
3
Three
4
Four
5
Five
6
Six
7
Seven
8
Eight
9
Nine
10
Ten
11
Eleven
12
Twelve
13
Thirteen
14
Fourteen
15
Fifteen
16
Sixteen
17
Seventeen
18
Eighteen
19
Nineteen
20
Twenty
21
Twenty-one
22
Twenty-two
23
Twenty-three
24
Twenty-four
25
Twenty-five
26
Twenty-six
27
Twenty-seven
28
Twenty-eight
29
Twenty-nine

Counting by tens

Here’s how you count by tens in English:

10
Ten
20
Twenty
30
Thirty
40
Fourty
50
Fifty
60
Sixty
70
Seventy
80
Eighty
90
Ninety
100
One hundred

Advanced Numbers

  • 1,000 – One thousand Play
  • 10,000 – Ten thousand Play
  • 100,000 – One hundred thousand Play
  • 1,000,000 – One million Play
  • 1,000,000,000 – One billion Play
  • 1,000,000,000,000 – One trillion Play
  • 1,000,000,000,000,000 – One quadrillion Play
Numbers smaller than 1 are usually described using decimal points:

  • 0.1 – Zero point one Play
  • 0.25 – Zero point two five Play
  • 0.386 – Zero point three eight six Play
  • 1.25 – One point two five Play
  • 13.214 – Thirteen point two one four Play
Numbers smaller than 1 can also be described using fractions:

  • 1/2 – One half Play
  • 1/3 – One third Play
  • 3/4 – Three quarters Play / Three fourths Play
  • 4/5 – Four fifths Play
  • 1/6 – One sixth Play
  • 2/7 – Two sevenths Play
  • 8/9 – Eight ninths Play
As numbers get bigger, we read them from left to right without saying “and” in between numbers:

  • 101 – One hundred one Play
  • 134 – One hundred thirty four Play
  • 1,282 – One thousand two hundred eighty two Play
  • 200,209 – Two hundred thousand two hundred nine Play
  • 1,390,413 – One million three hundred nintey thousand four hundred thirteen Play

Ordinal numbers

Ordnials tell the order of things – where the are in relation to one another. Ordinals are used in many contexts, including directions (“take the second left”), experiences (“my first day at school”), rankings (“he was in last place”) and many more.

  • 1st – First
  • 2nd – Second
  • 3rd – Third
  • 4th – Fourth
  • 5th – Fifth
  • 6th – Sixth
  • 7th – Seventh
  • 8th – Eighth
  • 9th – Ninth
  • 10th – Tenth
  • 11th – Eleventh
  • . . .
  • Last

Dates

In all English-speaking countries except the United States, dates are written in the format of Day/Month/Year (DMY). In the United States, the date is written in the format of Month/Day/Year (MDY). Consider the following date:

12/1/2005

If you speak with a person from the USA, they would assume the date is December 1st, 2005.
If you speak with a person from England, Australia, or most other places in the world, they would assume the date is January 12th, 2005.

Remember to consider who you are communicating with, and how they will interpret dates in a number format! For an interesting map of date formats around the world, see this Wikipedia page.